The Highlands of Scotland

The Highlands of Scotland

Highland Landscape Scotland has a very special place in my heart. Having grown up there I often feel now that I took for granted what people travel to see from all over the world. In my opinion, everyone should experience the highlands of Scotland at least once, it is truly a magical natural landscape.

The Highland Line in Scotland, the divide between the smooth lowlands and the sudden lifting of the mountains, runs from the south end of Loch Lomond towards Aberdeen and around to Inverness. Cross the line going north and you are in what many people think of as ‘real’ Scotland.

Here a dramatically stark beauty characterizes on one of Europe’s last great wilderness areas where solitude, space and silence can be found in abundance. Narrow roads twist through mountain passes and ruins still remain, testimony to the times, before the Highland clearances, when the landlords drove people from the land in favour of the more profitable sheep farming.

Along the way, stop in Speyside, the region surrounding the river spey. There are more whisky distilleries in this small area than anywhere else in the country. The grand malt whisky names such as Glennfiddich, Glenlivet, Macallan and many more, dot the whisky trail all the way to the sea.

The north-western Highlands with its tattered coast is wild and lonely place and, for many, the finest part of Scotland. Serrated by fjord-like sea lochs, the coastline is scattered with windswept, white-sand beaches and rugged, weather worn mountains. When the sun shines, you will notice the sparkle of the sea, the richness of colour and the clarity of the views out to the Hebrides. They are simply unique and amazing.

Lochness So, what else should you see there? The two obvious sights to visit are Lochness (try and get a glimpse of the lochness monster ‘Nessie’) and climb Ben Nevis and take in the stunning views.

Lochness is a deep freshwater loch however due to the high levels of peat in the water, it’s appearance is murky, making spotting ‘Nessie’ more difficult. It has stunning surroundings and is a peaceful, tranquil place to collect your thoughts.

Ben Nevis is 1343m (4406 ft) to the top, which obscures fort William below it and the top is hidden in the clouds. It is known as ‘The Ben’ to the some 75,000 hikers and climbers who come each year to walk the track to the summit. It is a bird watchers heaven as the summit is home to a vast amount of birds, that are not found in other climates. Climb it on a clear day and the views are breathtaking.

I suggest going in August, you will have to bring warm clothing, but it’s worth it as the purple heather fills the hills. If you go between May and mid-September you can witness the Highland Games taking place in several locations. Whenever you go it’s important people know where you are as it is very easy to get lost out there, and with a small population, it may be a long time before you cross paths with another person. It’s also important to pack a day bag appropriately with plenty food and water and wear warm, waterproof clothes as it can get very windy, wet and cold.

Ben Nevis Highland Sheep

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